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Hamlin crew members suspended 4 races over…

NASCAR on Monday suspended three critical crew members for Denny Hamlin’s team because a piece of tungsten fell off his car on the pace lap before the Coca-Cola 600

Why A Stranger Just Took Pictures Of Your House?

If you noticed a stranger recently stop in front of your house, take a photo or two and drive away, there are a number of reasons to do so that aren't completely creepy.

WHO Suspends Hydroxychloroquine Trial Over Safety…

The WHO is pausing testing on hydroxychloroquine for a week or two while it reviews data to make sure it's safe to continue testing it.

US Travel Ban Hurts Bolsonaro Further as Toll…

The number of confirmed coronavirus cases in Brazil has quadrupled this month, to 363,000, making it No. 2 in the world. The nation's COVID-19 death toll neared 23,000 on Monday. President Jair Bolsonaro has had to answer for a travel ban on noncitizens arriving from Brazil this weekend...

People pack into DC war memorials despite pandemic

Despite the risks surrounding the coronavirus pandemic, plenty of people still paid their respects to fallen soldiers by visiting war memorials in Washington DC during the holiday weekend. (May 25)

Wakey, Wakey: Millions Of Cicadas To Emerge After…

Cicadas are easy to spot, with their large bodies, big bulbous eyes, and see-through wings. Now, Gizmodo reports a brood of periodic cicadas not seen since 2003 is expected to emerge this year in parts of the United States. They're expected to rear their buggy, ugly heads in southwestern Virginia, parts of North Carolina, and West Virginia. The insects pose a threat to fruit and ornamental crops., so farmers are being warned to prepare accordingly. Incredibly, 1.5 million cicadas are expected to emerge per acre in the affected areas. Area residents may want to arm themselves with earplugs, as the males will be trying to find a mate with their impressively loud high-pitched drones.

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Jimmy Cobb, 'Kind of Blue' drummer for Miles…

Jimmy Cobb, a percussionist and the last surviving member of Miles Davis’ 1959 “Kind of Blue” groundbreaking jazz album, has died

This Day in History: 'Star Wars' Opens

This Day in History: 'Star Wars' Opens May 25, 1977 The first installment of George Lucas' saga "in a galaxy far, far away," premiered in the U.S. on Memorial Day weekend. Cinema would be forever marked by the premiere, described as an "earthquake" by Princess Leia star, Carrie Fisher. Months before the release, Lucas and 20th Century Fox co-ordinated an extensive marketing push. The anticipation for the film led to long lines, sold out showings and, ultimately, a pop culture phenomenon. Actors Mark Hamill, Harrison Ford and Carrie Fisher became overnight stars and fan obsessions. Now under the helm of Disney, new 'Star Wars' films and streaming shows are scheduled well into the 2020s.

Ex-US Marine May Spend 18 Years In A Russian…

Russian prosecutors asked a court on Monday to sentence former US Marine Paul Whelan. Whelan is accused of being at least a ranking US military intelligence colonel, caught red-handed trying to obtain secrets. According to Reuters, Whelan's lawyer said prosecutors want his client sentenced to 18 years in a maximum security prison. The prosecution has made a very harsh demand, it’s absolutely unjustified and groundless. To be honest, we’re in shock. Vladimir Zherebenkov Attorney for Paul Whelan US Ambassador in Moscow John Sullivan said the proceedings amounted to a 'secret trial' and a 'mockery of justice'. “There is no legitimacy to a procedure that is hidden behind closed doors. It is not transparent, it is not fair, and it is not impartial. Ambassador John Sullivan US Ambassador to Russia

Patrick Ewing Recovers at Home

Former New York Knicks star Patrick Ewing is recovering at home, just days after the announcement Friday that he was being treated at a hospital for COVID-19. "My father is now home and getting better," his son, Patrick Ewing Jr., tweeted Monday. "We’ll continue to watch his symptoms and follow...

Air tanker drops retardant over Arizona fire

This tanker drops retardant to contain the Cottonwood Fire burning in Pinal County, Arizona, on May 23. At least 120 acres burned and 75 percent is contained.

Trump Gives WHO 30 Day Ultimatum, Threatens to…

Trump Gives WHO 30 Day Ultimatum, Threatens to Permanently Cut US Funding President Donald Trump posted his letter to the WHO in a Monday night tweet. He threatened to pull the U.S. out of the World Health Organization (WHO) within 30 days, unless it will "commit to major substantive improvements." Trump had already enacted a 60-day suspension of U.S. payments to the body. The U.S. commits $400 million to the WHO, annually. In his letter, Trump accused the WHO director general of not being harsh enough on China, where the coronavirus is thought to have started. Donald Trump, Twitter Donald Trump, Twitter Earlier on Monday, China pledged $2 billion to the WHO. The nation responded to Trump's late night tweet, accusing him of using the country as an excuse to break U.S. financial obligations. Zhao Lijian, Foreign Ministry

Gucci, Saint Laurent seek radical redo of fashion…

Gucci and Saint Laurent are two of the highest profile luxury fashion houses to announce they will leave the fashion calendar behind, with its relentless four-times-a-year rhythm

Second stylist at Great Clips sick with COVID-19

A Springfield, Missouri hairstylist served 84 clients over eight days while experiencing symptoms of coronavirus. Now health officials say a coworker is sick. (May 25)

Stepfather Says He Drove Lance Armstrong 'Like an…

In new documentary Lance , Lance Armstrong says his stepfather was "kind of terrible"—but Terry Armstrong credits his abusive parenting with Lance's cycling success. "I would leave a drawer open, and he would pull out his fraternity paddle and just beat the shit out of me ," the cyclist said. Terry...

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Keselowski gets win but Hendrick Motorsports…

Brad Keselowski has won the Southern 500, the Bristol night race, the Brickyard 400, and now has crossed the Coca-Cola 600 off his checklist of crown jewel victories

Instagrammer Captures Heart-Stopping Video Of…

An Instagrammer captured a heart-stopping video of the Horseshoe bend.

President Trump Threatens To Relocate Republican…

Gov. Roy Cooper recently said decisions on whether to allow large gatherings in North Carolina will be based on health experts and data, not politics.

Golf Coverage Prompts New Trump Attacks

After their back-and-forth the past couple of days on the subject, President Trump launched another series of attacks on Joe Biden on Monday in defense of his golfing twice in Virginia over the holiday weekend. The president included former President Barack Obama as a target of criticism, as well as...

AP Top Stories May 25 P

Here's the latest for Monday May 25th: President Trump marks Memorial Day; Biden makes 1st in-person appearance since March; WHO to temporarily stop study of malaria drug and baby beluga whale born in Georgia.

Turkey records 29 deaths, 987 new COVID-19 cases

Turkey’s health minister announced 29 new deaths from COVID-19, bringing the death toll to 4,369

Netflix Plans to Get Rid of Inactive Subscribers

Netflix Plans to Get Rid of Inactive Subscribers According to Gizmodo, Netflix will send out email alerts and in-app notifications to users who haven't streamed anything in over a year since signing up. Those who have been inactive for the past two years will get a notice as well. If the user doesn't respond, their membership will be canceled. Netflix, via TechCrunch According to TechCrunch, Netflix says these "zombie accounts" represent less than one percent of its total base. If an account is canceled, the streaming company says it will give people 10 months to rejoin. Doing so within that grace period will allow users to gain back their data, viewing preferences and account details. Netflix's Eddy Wu, via Gizmodo As of April 2020, Netflix says it has almost 183 million total subscriptions.

Second Immigrant Dies Of Novel Coronavirus…

A man in custody of the US Immigrations and Customs Enforcement agency died on Sunday. Business Insider reports 34-year-old Santiago Baten-Oxlag died of complications from COVID-19. The Guatemalan immigrant died in a hospital in Columbus, Georgia, that he had been transferred to from ICE's Stewart Detention Center, in Lumpkin, Georgia. He's the second immigrant to die from COVID-19 while in ICE custody. El Salvadoran Carlos Escobar Mejia died from the virus earlier this month. As of May 16, 1,201 ICE detainees had tested positive for COVID-19, including 16 at the facility where Baten-Oxlag was being held. As of last week, ICE was holding 26,000 people in its detention centers across the US.

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After 17-Year Break, Region Expects Millions of…

They're no giant murder hornets , but they do make a racket. Millions upon millions of cicadas are due to surface this year after 17 years in the ground, CNN reports. People in Southwest Virginia, parts of North Carolina and West Virginia will witness the event this year, per Virginia Tech...

Cars plow through severe flooding in Miami

Heavy rainfall inundated the streets of Miami, Florida, with floodwaters. Cars plowed through the flooding causing water to splash everywhere on May 25.

US Men Are Less Likely to Wear Face Masks Because…

US Men Are Less Likely to Wear Face Masks Because 'They're Not Cool,' Says Study The study was conducted by researchers from Middlesex University London and the Berkeley Mathematical Science Research Institute. According to the study, mandatory face coverings to mitigate the coronavirus “has a larger effect on men than on women.” Study Authors, via 'New York Post' The study also found that men are less likely than women to believe they will be affected by COVID-19. Study Authors, via 'New York Post' Data published in the 'European Heart Journal' reveals that men are more than twice as likely to die from COVID-19 than women. The Centers for Disease Control currently recommends that some form of face covering is worn by everyone in public. As of Friday afternoon, more than 1,427,000 people in the U.S. have contracted the coronavirus. Nearly 87,000 people in the U.S. have died.