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Iran confirms damaged nuclear site was centrifuge…

Iran has confirmed that a damaged building at the underground Natanz nuclear site was a new centrifuge assembly center

Rare Footage Of Newborn Gorilla In The Wild

Here's some rare footage of a newborn gorilla in the wild.

'Gang-Related' Shooting At South Carolina Club…

Greensville County sheriff says shooters may be associated with the headliner Foogiano.

103-Year-Old Dives Right Out of the Sky

Falling from 14,000 feet up is hair-raising enough, but doing it at 103? "I never thought I would be around this long," Al Blaschke told ABC News after making his Guinness World Records-breaking leap with two grandsons. Blaschke, who tied the record back in 2017 at age 100, took...

AP Top Stories July 5 P

Here's the latest for Sunday, July 5: Christopher Columbus statue toppled in Baltimore; India sees another record jump in coronavirus cases; Rio's Catholic church reopens for mass; baby Hawksbill turtles born on nearly empty Thailand beaches. (July 5)

MLB Cancels All-Star Game

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Liverpool makes triumphant Anfield return as…

Liverpool has won its first game at Anfield as the newly crowned English champion and moved in sight of a slew of records which would cap one of the best ever top-flight campaigns

This Day in History: American Colonies Declare…

This Day in History: American Colonies Declare Independence July 4, 1776 The Declaration of Independence was adopted in Philadelphia during the first Continental Congress. 12 colonies would ratify the Declaration on this day. New York would ratify on the twelfth. Written by Thomas Jefferson, the Declaration was essentially a list of colonist grievances with the British. Jefferson's ideas about equality were borrowed largely from European philosophers, including John Locke. The famous words, "We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal ..." would alter the course of human history. The United States would become an independent nation with the defeat of the British and signing of the Treaty of Paris in 1783.

Woman Dies Falling From Roller Coaster

Paris (CNN) A woman died Sunday after falling from a roller coaster in a theme park in Oise, in northern France. The accident occurred on Saturday around 1:45 pm at Parc Saint Paul, the park said in a news release. Authorities in Oise confirmed the incident to CNN. The woman, 32, fell while riding the Formula 1 Coaster. Children at least 4 feet or taller can ride the Formula 1, described by the park as a family friendly attraction. Parc Saint Paul reopened on June 6 with coronavirus guidelines set in place, including a mask requirement and social distancing measures.

Books Are Vanishing in Hong Kong Libraries

Now unavailable in Hong Kong libraries: books by leading democracy activists. At least nine titles by authors like Joshua Wong and Tanya Chan are disappearing from city libraries only days after China passed a severe national security law , the South China Morning Post reports. The agency in charge of Hong...

Showers, storms to pester Southeast this week

The unsettled pattern will continue across the southeastern U.S. this week as each afternoon brings the chance for showers and drenching thunderstorms.

Official US COVID-19 Death Toll Is a 'Substantial…

Official US COVID-19 Death Toll Is a 'Substantial Undercount,' Yale Study Finds Conducted by researchers at Yale University, the study was published on Wednesday in 'JAMA Internal Medicine.' Using data from the National Center for Health Statistics Data, the study compared excess deaths in the U.S. between March 1 and May 30 with deaths from COVID-19 during the same time. The total deaths of 781,000 during this time was 122,300 higher than expected. 95,235 of these deaths were attributed to coronavirus. According to researchers, most of the remaining excess deaths were likely caused by the coronavirus as well. Dan Weinberger, Yale, via CNBC Because COVID-19 affects almost every system of the body, the uptick in strokes and heart attacks was also indirectly caused by the coronavirus. Some states, including TX and AZ, show more than a 50 percent discrepancy between COVID-19 deaths and excess deaths.

Brewers' Yelich knows he had fortunate timing on…

Milwaukee Brewers outfielder Christian Yelich acknowledges he benefited from fortunate timing in his contract negotiations

Columbus statue toppled by protesters in Baltimore

Baltimore protesters pulled down a statue of Christopher Columbus and threw it into the city's Inner Harbor Saturday night. Video captured by reporter Louis Krauss of The Baltimore Brew shows the moment the statue came down. (July 5)

Vegas Bettors Bank Nearly $250K in 'Pure Theft'

Las Vegas bettors racked up nearly $250,000 in winnings last weekend in what might be the city's biggest sportsbook loss ever. The cause: an apparent manual-entry error that allowed people to bet on Korean and Chinese baseball games that had already started, the Las Vegas Review-Journal reports. "This was...

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Indians manager Francona favors nickname change…

Manager Terry Francona believes it's time for the Cleveland Indians to change their nickname

Science Reveals Why Our Shoelaces Come Untied

Here's why our shoelaces come untied.

Dozens Of People Dead Or Presumed Dead In Japan…

Rescue efforts have been complicated by continued risk of flooding and mudslides.

Infection That Attacks Brain Reemerges in Florida

The brain-eating amoeba has resurfaced in Florida. The state's Health Department has confirmed the case, saying only that the patient is in Hillsborough County. Naegleria fowleri usually is found in warm freshwater environments, including ponds, rivers and lakes. The state did not say where the infection was contracted, the Tampa...

Today in History for July 5th

Highlights of this day in history: Elvis Presley holds his first major recording session; Birth of the bikini; Enron's Kenneth Lay dies; Arthur Ashe wins at Wimbledon; Larry Doby follows Jackie Robinson; Baseball's Ted Williams dies. (July 5)

Why A Heat Advisory Might Not Be Issued, Even If…

Miami hasn't had just one hot day this year, but rather weeks and weeks of intense heat. In fact, CNN reports seven of the 10 hottest weeks on record have occurred this year -- and temperatures usually don't peak until the beginning of August. On Tuesday, the temperature at Miami International Airport reached 98 degrees Fahrenheit, but no heat advisories or excessive heat warnings were issued. On the same day, a high temperature of 91 degrees was recorded in Topeka, Kansas, and a heat advisory was issued. Yet 91 degrees is cooler than 96 degrees! Turns out, every National Weather Service (NWS) office has different criteria for heat advisories and excessive heat warnings. The NWS takes into account a region's topography, climatology and potential urban heat island effects. And while some offices use the heat index measurement, others use the 'wet bulb globe reading,' which takes into account sun angle, cloud cover, and wind speed.

Duke, Dominion cancel contested Atlantic Coast Pipeline

The developers of the Atlantic Coast Pipeline have announced they are canceling the multi-state natural gas project due to delays and “increasing cost uncertainty.”

Hand Sanitizer May Make Fireworks More Dangerous…

Hand Sanitizer May Make Fireworks More Dangerous on July 4 With the ongoing pandemic, many people have integrated alcohol-based hand sanitizer into their daily lives. Combined with Fourth of July celebrations, which rely heavily on fireworks, the pairing could lead to trouble. NSC's Maureen Vogel, via CNN The National Safety Council has strongly recommended that people leave the fireworks to the professionals this year. According to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, 57% of the 7,000 firework-related injuries from July 4 last year were from burns.

Ticking Time Bomb: This Summer Could See An…

Nature-lovers could face a collision course between the novel coronavirus COVID-19 and tick-borne illnesses this summer. According to CNN, scientists say the mild 2020 winter has created an ideal environment for ticks. Likewise, hikers, campers, and anyone else yearning for a break could burst en masse into the outdoors. And its already begun to happen. For example, outdoor crowds were so big around Memorial Day weekend that parks across the US had to close early after hitting capacity. What's more, warning signs for tick-borne illnesses are very similar to the severity seen with COVID-19: fever, muscle aches, headaches, and severe fatigue.

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The 2024 Buzz Has Started— for a Surprising Name

The 2020 election is still months away, but it's evidently not too early to start the speculation about 2024. And in this case, the speculation centers on Tucker Carlson of Fox News, who is the subject of multiple stories—most notably at Politico and Business Insider —that explain why he...

Planes fly over Bunker Hill to celebrate Fourth…

A number of planes flew in formation over Bunker Hill in Boston, Massachusetts, to celebrate the Fourth of July.

Over 50,000 New US Coronavirus Cases Reported in…

Over 50,000 New US Coronavirus Cases Reported in a Single Day According to Johns Hopkins University, 50,203 coronavirus cases were reported in the U.S. on Wednesday. To put those numbers into perspective, in the early days of the pandemic, it took more than two months to reach the 50,000 mark in the U.S. The previous record of cases reported in a single day occurred on June 26. On that day, there were 45,255 cases. On Wednesday, five states reported a record number of cases: CA, AZ, NC, TX and TN. Reopening of businesses in many of the states has been rolled back or halted. Gavin Newsom, CA Governor, via CNN The record number of cases comes as states are prepping for Fourth of July celebrations. Infectious disease experts refer to the holiday as "the perfect storm." Dr. Ricardo Franco, University of Alabama